myHanse.com - Hanse Yacht Owners Website myHanse.com - Hanse Yacht Owners Website myHanse.com - Hanse Yacht Owners Website myHanse.com - Hanse Yacht Owners Website

Welcome to myHanse.com the forum for Hanse Yachts owners throughout the world.

Forum Home Forum Home > Hints and Tips > 311 / 312 / 315
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - A Hanse 315 improvement
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

A Hanse 315 improvement

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
Caspar B View Drop Down
Lieutenant
Lieutenant


Joined: 03 July 2017
Location: Norway
Status: Offline
Points: 21
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caspar B Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: A Hanse 315 improvement
    Posted: 19 September 2017 at 12:15
I thought I'd start a thread where I will post what I do to my new Hanse 315 in order to make it more to my liking. Will try to update with pictures when time permits.

Problem nr1:
Resistance! Resistance everywhere! The halyards, the sheets, the lot!

Self tacker: the sheet is led from the winch to the mast via two plain bearing blocks, one attached to the hull, one at the goosneck. The sheet is then led through a slot in the mast, up to a block on the mast centreline, exiting the mast, before going down to a plain bearing block on the self tacking rail before being attached to the clew. Phew! I see several sources of large resistance:

- The sheet is a pretty stiff 10mm dynema. With all the sharp turns bending resistance is created.
 
- The plain bearing blocks are not as free running as they could be. If I use the 2:1 system on the self tacker the sheet has to go trough 5 blocks (and a camcleat). Switching to ball/roller bearing blocks would certainly give some improvement. How much I don't know. 

- The angle of the sheet going from the block on the gooseneck to the slot in the mast is far from ideal. In worst case (starboard tack) the sheet enters the slot at about 30°. Mix that with a stiff and thick 10mm sheet and I get lots of drag.

Possible solutions:
- Replace 10mm sheet to 8mm. I know, this is not as comfortable to pull, but my experience has been that it is very seldom that I sheet the foresail without the use of the winch. Smaller diameter means less resistance in every block and makes for a freer running sheet in light conditions. 

- Move the gooseneck block to the mast. I intend to do this by attaching the block to a flat dynema loop, wrapped around the mast profile. I intend to do this to the German mainsheet too as to make the force somewhat symmetric. The result will be an angle from block to mast slot that is nearly perfect.

- Replace high angle/high load blocks to roller bearing and low load/low angle blocks to ball bearing blocks. 

Halyard: For some reason there is also way too much resistance in the halyard. I have Seldén MDS cars, but winching is always required when raising the main. This shouldn't be needed on a 30sqm main. In addition to this my so called "high tech" halyard (10mm) is stretchy like a bungee, making it almost impossible to maintain tension on the main.

Possible solutions:
- Clean and lube mast track

- Replace main halyard to proper high tech dyneema and reduce dimentions to 8mm to enable...

- A 2:1 main halyard system.  This way my wife, and later on my kid, will hopefully be able to raise the main without the use of a winch. It will also reduce compression on the mast, less slippage in the clutch and less weight aloft.


Back to Top
grumpydatagit View Drop Down
Commander
Commander


Joined: 22 August 2015
Location: Lymington
Status: Offline
Points: 99
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote grumpydatagit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 September 2017 at 14:55
I would certainly agree with reducing the lines to 8mm Dyneema -I had exactly the same problem as you and  it made a massive difference to hoisting may mailsail
Back to Top
Caspar B View Drop Down
Lieutenant
Lieutenant


Joined: 03 July 2017
Location: Norway
Status: Offline
Points: 21
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caspar B Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2017 at 20:55
8mm dyneema is expensive... I'm checking different avenues to get the best price.

I also need to figure out how to attach the halyard in the masthead for a 2:1 main halyard.

Anyone happen to have a good picture of the 315 masthead? I was hauled up there this summer but forgot to bring a camera... Ermm

Replaced the German mainsheet to a Seldén 6:1 block and tackle as I prefer this for singlehand sailing. Also less resistance.

2016 Hanse 315
Back to Top
iemand View Drop Down
Vice Admiral
Vice Admiral
Avatar

Joined: 13 February 2004
Location: Germany
Status: Offline
Points: 838
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote iemand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2017 at 09:47
I would let the job sheet from the track to the bow instead of up in the mast. That saves a lot of angles. With 2:1 SHEETING WILL BECOME EASY.
regarding the main I can't believe your problem. On my 370 I'm able to hoist the main from the cockpit for 98%. 42sqm membrane sail, 10mm good quality dyneema. Maybe a better dyneema to get more peak force on the sail instead of stretching the rope. 2:1 WILL double the LENGTH!!!
Hanse 312 MJ 2004 - Hanse 370e MJ 2007
Back to Top
Caspar B View Drop Down
Lieutenant
Lieutenant


Joined: 03 July 2017
Location: Norway
Status: Offline
Points: 21
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caspar B Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2017 at 19:14
Thank you for your input.
I have considered leading the jib sheet from the bow, but that introduce a few disadvantages on it's own. But I do agree that would make for a more efficient solution.

Regarding 2:1 main halyard: The length of the halyard will be a tad over mastlength x 3,5 instead of mastlength x 2,5. That's not double length. When the main is down the amount of rope in the cockpit will be the same/smaller. With the main raised there will be around 12 meter extra halyard coiled on the cabin floor. And since this will be 8mm - not 10 mm - the space taken will be about the same.

I must admit switching to 2:1 halyard is also a matter of trying something new, but my wife and kid will clearly benefit from a lighter pull. And since my existing halyard is of poor quality I have to change halyard anyway. The difference in price between 45mx8mm vs 32mX10mm is neglible. A 2:1 halyard will also have other benefits like less mast compression, less weight aloft and less stress on cleats.


2016 Hanse 315
Back to Top
Fendant View Drop Down
Admiral
Admiral


Joined: 03 November 2012
Location: Switzerland
Status: Offline
Points: 1082
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fendant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2017 at 12:14
Caspar,
 
did you consider how to avoid the two ropes banging against the mast for a good night's sleep ?
 
 
Frank
Back to Top
Caspar B View Drop Down
Lieutenant
Lieutenant


Joined: 03 July 2017
Location: Norway
Status: Offline
Points: 21
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Caspar B Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2017 at 19:10
The halyard? Same way as with any other halyard. I attach it to the rail on the coachroof when not in use.
2016 Hanse 315
Back to Top
grumpydatagit View Drop Down
Commander
Commander


Joined: 22 August 2015
Location: Lymington
Status: Offline
Points: 99
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote grumpydatagit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2017 at 20:35
Just a thought

I  would attach it to the end of the boom and that way it won't rub against the side of the sheave box causing a wear point when the wind vibrates it.
Back to Top
Pieterman View Drop Down
Commander
Commander


Joined: 05 December 2015
Location: Oostende
Status: Offline
Points: 99
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pieterman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 October 2017 at 11:43
Attaching the halyard to te end of the boom creates an extra toppinglift and thus secures more than a single toppinglift.
I often choose to leave the halyard attachted to the main sail, but in stead of leading upwards directly I pull the halyard down around a clew before going up again. So the top of the main sail is secured. To prevent the halyard from making noise on the mast, I pull it away from the mast with a little line between halyard and rig.
Pieterman
Hanse 315 #523
Back to Top
samuel View Drop Down
Admiral of the Fleet
Admiral of the Fleet


Joined: 26 December 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 2158
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote samuel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 October 2017 at 12:50
If you have a 2:1 halyard solution first check that you have room between top of the sail & the mast head for the block plus shackle etc when under full load & that the halyard will feed into the masthead sheave correctly when at the top & not cause it to jump the pulley & jam in the side so you cannot get the sail down. The block may have a tendency to push the halyard out of alignment slightly when right at the top under load


Edited by samuel - 07 October 2017 at 12:53
Daydream Believer- Hanse 311- No GBR9917T- Bradwell Essex
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.04
Copyright ©2001-2015 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.

Links : www.hanseyachts.co.uk www.hanseyachts.com www.fjordboats.co.uk www.dehler.co.uk www.varianta.co.uk