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Cockpit teak treatment

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silversailor View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15 September 2015 at 23:00
I was wondering what everyone was doing to the teak seating in the cockpit.  I have left mine alone, allowed it to "grey" and use a mild cleaner (rubbing against the grain) occasionally. Some of the material around the seams is disappearing and I would appreciate suggestions on how to either fill or replace that material, what to use, etc.
Silversailor
South Haven, MI USA
S/V Legacy
Hanse 370e, #9
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Wayne's World View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wayne's World Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2015 at 08:16
Silversailor,

When cleaning teak you should always rub across the grain not along or against the grain. Rubbing along or against the grain will quickly cause the softer growth to be eroded away. Teak is a "soft" hardwood and it is easy to inadvertently erode.  

When you say "some of the material around the seams is disappearing" I gather you mean the teak not the Sika? If it is the teak the only thing you can do is sand the teak/Sika down to give you a new flat surface. But the teak is thin (about 7mm) on most boats these day so you don't have much teak to sand. But you should be able to sand it a few times before there is a problem. When you sand teak you should sand along the grain not across. If you sand across it is very difficult to get the sanding scratches out. For such a small area I would hand sand using a cork block to wrap the sand paper around or you can get plastic "floats" with a handle that you can attached the sand paper onto which are larger than the normal cork blocks. You need to keep the block flat on the seat when sanding so you get a flat finish. Don't sand with the sand paper only in your hand as the uneven pressure applied by your fingers will give you grooves in the teak. Use a 60 or 80 grit sand paper. Any thing finer and you will be at it all day.

If it is the Sika which is "disappearing" the seams can be recorked. The solution is to take out the old Sika runs and reapply the Sika. Carefully cut either side of the Sika joint with a sharp boxcutter and then you should able to pull the Sika out. To reapply - mask the joint on either side with masking tape and apply the Sika into the groove leaving it slightly "proud" because as the Sika sets it shrinks so if it isn't "proud" you will end up with a joint which is concave. You can smooth the Sika run by running your finger along the joint. You should ware latex type gloves when working with Sika. Wet the gloves finger with water with a small amount of dish washing liquid mixed in and lightly run your finger along the run. The water stops the glove from sticking to the Sika. Remove the masking tape once the Sika has started to harden - say 20-30 minutes after application. Allow the Sika 24-48 hours to harden before sanding. It can be a messy job to reSika but once you get the hang of it, it is fairly easy. From memory the correct Sika to us is 290DC (deck corking) and make sure the tubes you buy have plenty of "use by" time left. Old or out of date Sika is harder to use and the job with be more difficult and may not last as well.  

  
Wayne W
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Rubato View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rubato Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2015 at 17:18
Wayne,
I don't understand what the difference is between "across the grain" versus "against the grain", seems like the same thing to me. In my mind there are only 2 choices: in the same direction as the grain or not in the same direction. 
Steve

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SausalitoDave View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SausalitoDave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2015 at 17:57
Not is the same direction

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Wayne's World View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wayne's World Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2015 at 18:35
Steve,

Most decking teak is cut using a "quarter sawn" method which results in the edge grain running along the plank. So going with or against the grain is when you rub along the length of the plank. The grain in quarter sawn teak is actually the growth rings and these rings will be wider and softer in good seasons of growth and narrower and harder in harsher seasons. The softer growth rings are more easily eroded by cleaning/ rubbing along the plank which is with the grain going one way and against the other way. Natural aging of the teak results in the erosion of these softer growth rings and gives the teak a ribbed texture.

Cleaning teak across the grain - ie at 90 degrees to the way the plank is laid - you minimize the damage to the softer material. Rubbing along/against the grain erodes this softer growth rings.
Wayne W
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Rubato View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rubato Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2015 at 18:45
Ahh, gotcha. I was thinking against was 90 degrees across for some reason.
 
After 8 seasons, I don't see much wear on Rubato's cockpit teak. I don't pay much attention to the direction I scrub, I'd consider it random. Most of the time I'm just rinsing it with water but the brush I do use once in awhile is a soft deck brush. I've never treated it with oil.
 
Steve


Edited by Rubato - 16 September 2015 at 18:46
Steve

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Lippe View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lippe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2015 at 20:27
I have done the cleaning only once by brush and seawater and do not plan to repeat cleaning before it is really dirty or has green growth on some spots. I just red an article that says this, and the way how you actually do is the most suitable. Teak does not need extra oil. It has it's own. Too much oil makes it unpleasant and gradually destroys the teak.
 
Kari
"True sailor doesn't ask for proper wind. He learns how to sail"
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