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Floor boards and bilgewater

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JohnA View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JohnA Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2011 at 16:10
Thanks Charles.

I hope that the bilge information is useful for other members. On the subject of gas detectors - perhaps Yeoman/ the moderator could suggest where the most suitable position for a gas detector should be for a 320?

John.
Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'
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AdrianB View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AdrianB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2011 at 12:42



Here are some picture our ever helpful dealer took for me when the floor boards were up on our Hanse 320.








Edited by AdrianB - 14 May 2011 at 13:00
Liquid Leisure - Hanse 320#266 http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au
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JohnA View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JohnA Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2011 at 12:11
Thanks Adrian,

 What fantastic pictures. These prove the point of what I was saying, in that there has to be a lot of water in the bilges before the water fills the electrically pumped area.

 I bet a lot of people didn't know that!

John
Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'
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Janni View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Janni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2011 at 05:55
Why arenīt there holes between the outer side and the bilge?
Janni
Hanse 320 #548 "SCHNEGGE"
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MisterM View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MisterM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 June 2011 at 20:42
Since owning my first boats (and house as well, come to think of it), I have been plagued by leakages both above and below the waterline with any model. My first newly acquired boat, the H320, was no exception unfortunately, but until now (and hopefully forever) only from above the waterline (leaking windows, leakage through the "swan's neck for the cables in the mast" and leakage from the stern shower and water tap in the bathroom.
 
My observations and lessons learned at all boats until now, partially duplicating what was already said, are as follows:
1) A maniacal tendency to trace any leakage and repair it; I will tolerate no water in my boat, as any leakage has the potential to ruin interior or components, or sink the boat
2 Point 1 goes double as I want to be able to distinguish between leakages above and below the waterline, since the latter are intolerable
3 The H320 have a bilge system which is A) not appropriately interconnected between the stringers and B) does not have a bassin in which the water is collected at the deepest point, resulting in water potentially being "caught" in one part of the structure. Once the boat starts heeling, the water can penetrate, amongst others, the storage area below the benches, and also the battery storage place as well as the engine electronics. Damage to interior, belongings or elements safeguarding the vessel can be the result. Thus further stressing the importance of point 1.
4) The taps in the boat, at least in the Smartline-version, including the stern shower, are of cheap quality, especially given the connectors to the pipes which are of a "click"-nature. I strongly recommend to replace the 2 taps with good quality ones having a "screw"-connection to the pipes. In addition, I recommend to replace the stern shower with a stainless-steel head and provide proper attention to shutting it off after every use (this involves turning the knob around until the flow of water stops).
5) In addition, but I have no experience with this yet, it might be wise to check (or replace, if necessary) the connections of the hoses to the water tank and inbetween, but these appear quite sturdy to me.
6) Keep 2 or 3 type of hand pumps aboard (including oil pumps) to be able to drain any part of the bilge where there is water. I like the suggestion of creating small holes in the cabin floor to access them easily!
7) There is much dust (from the building process) in all inaccessible areas which, in the case of a serious leakage, would result in being led to the bilge pump, and quickly making it unasable as it would become blocked by it. So vacuum cleaning all areas of the boat to get them free from dust and potential small debris is, in my view, also essential.
8) When not left in a warmed winter storage, always use drinkingwater antifreeze (e.g. the pink stuff from Starbrite) generously in the system, which also prevents the boiler from corroding (which will or can occur when being left empty for a longer period). Wodka is a good alternative, but could leave some taste.
9) If sailing in heavy weather or at sea, make sure to have some accustomed shelters aboard to place over any potentially damaged windows. In addition, all openings (being the gas lever for the engine, the openings for the stern shower, the lockers in the cockpit, the anchor storage, the swan's neck at the mast, all hatches and windows, the entrance to the cockpit, etc., etc. will leak at some point in time, so it's worthwile to make covers for them or make them waterproof through applying putty or any other thing.
 
Looking forward to other contributions and tips for the tenacious and maniacal sailors amongst us!
 
Best regards, Machiel.
 
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gode.wind View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gode.wind Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 July 2011 at 12:18
Hi Adrian,

I am sailing  in Germany and I have also a problem with water in the bilge.
Last year, the windows have been replaced by Hanse, because these were
glued false and a lot of water entered here.
I have the following question:
Holes in the stringers can be seen. Are these made from you or
been made ​​by Hanse? I think a lot of water is also standing in the
stringers and i have in the moment no way to get this water because
my ship has not such holes in the stringers.
Thank you for replay and understanding my bad english.

Greetings from Germany (Hamburg)
Lothar
l
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Casper View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Casper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 July 2011 at 21:41
I am very pleased at the helpful responses to my original question and I am now a lot wiser, and Like JohnA. now over 90 litres of water lighter.

Not only was the water pump split by freezing but when it was finally replaced it disclosed leaks at the heads taps and, more seriously at the hot water tank. Thanks too for the excellent photographs from yourself and Adrian, but realise that this is an inner pan with the hull still a space away under that!     Please note this point gode.wind.

MisterM summed up my attitude that boats should not be designed to keep water in, but to keep it out, and allow for its removal quickly and easily in the case of any accident.

Like Charles you obviously agree with me that a bilge pump might be expected to pump out the bilge and not a pan in in inner lining just below the cabin sole!   What that is supposed to do defeats me unless it is only expected to be used when the boat is half submerged by a breaking wave!

In fact the more I look at the interior design the more I think that the sailor designed the exterior and someone who had never been to sea designed the interior. (e.g. no fiddles on the table or shelves and totally inaccessible real bilge low point. I won't get on to accessing wiring!)

I am now considering how best to reach the lowest point inside the hull, below the false bilge in which the original bilge pump is fitted. An extra pump will then try to keep the real bilge clear. It looks like the aft of three trunkings that run athwart-ships is the last place that water gathers and spills from there to other areas as the boat moves. That is just ahead of the galley sink cupboard floor access, and is reached by removing the under starboard bench storage bin when the real hull can be seen. It is forward of your suggestion John. A strum box on the end of a pipe could be fed in to near the centre line. Perhaps this will finally lead to a dry boat and if necessary remove spilt gas.

Hope to go sailing one day instead of hanging upside down with pumps and sponges. It is all a real waste of time for which I hold Hanse responsible.
Friendly ghost
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AdrianB View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AdrianB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 August 2011 at 08:20
Originally posted by gode.wind gode.wind wrote:

Hi Adrian,

Holes in the stringers can be seen. Are these made from you or
been made ​​by Hanse?
l


The boat when it was pictured was a standard 320 #266

I should add that after tracing bilge leaks to a) a leaking head sink tap, and b)  the transom shower...  we may have found our final culprit. At the last engine service  I was advised that one of the cooling hoses was leaking and a replacement was fitted. Sadly because our boat is in commercial survey the bill was not covered by the dealer as a warantee claim.
I can't tell you exactly which hose had to be replaced... but I was told it was a common failure on a Yanmar engine.
Looking forward to a season with a dry bilge now!
Liquid Leisure - Hanse 320#266 http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au
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poole pirate View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote poole pirate Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 November 2011 at 15:05
We had a lot of problems with bilge water until we discovered the cockpit shower fitting split every winter. After replacing three times we now hopefully have a slightly better one.
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Windsurfer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Windsurfer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 November 2011 at 21:50
Poole pirate...I think you would be better off winterizing the water system before the winter to make sure nothing splits ...otherwise you might end up with split pipes and then spend endless hours replacing them...

Edited by Windsurfer - 08 November 2011 at 21:51
Hanse 320 #079
White hull, tiller, short keel and rudder, standard North sails, Sparcraft rig
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