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Gybing the 575

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Relentless View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 August 2018 at 17:28
Prior to owning my 575, I have never sailed a boat this large and my experience is mostly racing dinghies on lakes here in Ohio.    I've been learning a lot over the summer!!!
 
How do you Gybe your 575?   Lets say in 15-18knts of wind.
 
I've played with different methods:
 
1. Haul in the main sheet with winch until the boom is close to the center, then Gybe and ease main.  I like this the most.
 
2. Gybe with boom out and as it back winds and crosses over, try to haul in the slack main sheet as fast as possible to "catch" the boom and ease it after the gybe.  It requires a large boat turn to get the main backwinded...and there's usually some yelling involved with crew.  haha!
 
3. Start the engine and full throttle to try to move the apparent wind foreword or at least lower the apparent wind speed. Gybe, then shut off engine.  not sure about this one.....
 
4. 270 degree tack.  Uhg!  there is a lots of sail flogging during this maneuver!  I don't like it.
 
When sailing downwind, I sail fairly high....hardly ever dead down wind.  I like hotter/higher angle for speed and stability...so in a narrow bay like the Narragensett, I Gybe often. 
 
How do you gybe?   What about higher wind speeds....say 25knts.    Full sail or reefed? 
 
Rob
 
Rob
s/v Relentless
2015 Hanse 575
Newport, RI
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sailkoop View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sailkoop Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 August 2018 at 17:56
Hi Rob,
I am with #1! The Reason is that the mainsheet is in the middle of the boom and if you have to much force on the boom by gybing the boom will brake!! Important is to ease the main quickly after the Wind comes from the other side, even by higher Windspeed! If you are talking about 25kn downwind you can go with full Main, if you ease out quickly the Main, otherwise you'll go immediately into the Sun....
best regards

Bjoern

http://www.sy-serafina.de
Hanse 470e #165

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Wayne's World View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wayne's World Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 August 2018 at 18:18
Rob,

We use your option #1 when gybing and if sailing in winds of 25kn we would reef even downwind because as you know the main sail is large. In 25kn you do not need 90sm of mail sail up. This season we bought a BWR down wind sail of 220sm made by Elvstrom which is easy to put up and down and needs no poles or other lines except the sheets. We have not had the BWR up in 25kn downwind as yet but they say you can use it in up to 30kn downwind. We will see.   
Wayne W
Cruising, currently in the Mediterranean.
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Ballistic View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ballistic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 August 2018 at 00:09
Rob     My wife and I have raced and  cruised our 531 for over 14 years now.  Certainly option 1 is best for racing but in a strong breeze ,with limited crew ,a bit hairy.  Given the mid-boom sheeting these big yachts have , I would "granny" tack 90% of the time. when cruising. The time you lose with this manouver is certainly offset by not having to replace your boom so often.  Ballistic  2004   531
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Black Diamond View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Black Diamond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 August 2018 at 01:53
To me it depends upon the strength of the wind.   If its light winds (say 5-8 true) then you can do things a little differently than if its blowing 20-25 true.    I've used your #1 many times.   The thing I worry about is the sail backing on to the spreaders. 

For some reason,   if you simply gybe with the mainsheet locked (you don't bring the sail into the centerline of the boat) I find that the sail can be backed on to the spreaders  even if it wasn't on the other side.     I worry about damaging the sail, and so #1 lets me actively control how that plays out.

FWIW



Edited by Black Diamond - 28 August 2018 at 01:54
Rick
S/V Black Diamond
Hanse 575 #161
Newport, RI
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marcopone View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote marcopone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2018 at 22:34
I always use #1 method.
With strong wind and sea you may want to make a 270 to avoid much stress to the boat and to yourself.
In that case you need the motor help because the boat will slow down too much during the tack.
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Ballistic View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ballistic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2018 at 23:25
Hi   If the wind is so light that the boat slows down during the" granny  tack" [I presume AKA 270 ] ,obviously you would do a conventional gybe  . Stress free . John Ballistic   531     2004
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Black Diamond View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Black Diamond Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 August 2018 at 00:11
I've never needed the engine to complete a "poor mans gybe".      As was said,  if its too light to give you enough speed for the tack, then you should have done a conventional gybe anyway.

FWIW
Rick
S/V Black Diamond
Hanse 575 #161
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mopoulter View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mopoulter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2018 at 15:47
# 1 is best all others seem too complicated and prone to a mistake
Although year in heavy air and towing a dinghy we (my wife and I) did the 270 degree "gybe" We call it a chicken gybeSmile
mp

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wild Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 September 2018 at 10:54
#1 is what we do with TWA winds up to max 20 knots and full main
+20 it depends how much main we have up we go for the "gale round" in Flemisch "storm rondje" (the chicken gibe our what ever you call it) we call the 270 gibe
Wild and Wet
Belgium
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