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Hanse upgrades on Tangleberry

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scarab View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scarab Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2008 at 13:40
Grahame,
 
Can you post a pic of your Hanse 371 with the Tartarooga hard dodger ?
 
Koen
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 May 2008 at 15:51
With and without canvas.  The top picture is during a race, which we won. The dodger extends quite far over the cockpit so you can sit under it out of the rain. We have a back curtain which turns it into a two person wheelhouse, we can steer from there using the autopilot remote. It is strong enough to stand on.
 
This year the mainsail cover began to fall apart and I replaced it with a new one. I had it made so it comes far enough forward to eliminate the need for the separate front cover. Since my main is loose footed (an early modification, at the same time I had the leach shortened 15 cm to raise the boom a bit) the new sail cover is all one piece like a bag around the sail. I also had a flap put over the zipper as exposed to the sun they soon begin to get brittle and loose teeth.
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rubato Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 May 2008 at 21:42
Grahame, thanks for the lead on the stern line reel. I'll give them a call!
Steve
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 May 2008 at 00:21
Tangleberry racing
 
We were in the first race of the West Vancouver Yacht Club Wed. night series last night. Finished first in the no spinnaker cruising division.  Crew of two, my son and I.  We used the self-tacker, so not much to do, it was  a simple windward-leeward course. We used the spinnaker sheets on the jib for the downwind leg to lead it outboard, and tacked down wind. The only boat near us was a Jeanneau 40 which rates faster but couldn't save her time. www.wvyc.bc.ca
 
We race with the Rocna anchor on the bow, dodger with solar panels. etc. Looking very cruisey. It doesn't seem to slow us down but annoys the opposition!
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 May 2008 at 23:02
A few more upgrades.
 
My boat has the single aft cabin layout with separate stall shower. The shower is a success in function, but on long cruises we need the space so it ends up being a pantry/wet locker.  The problem is that the space is not divided, and anything placed on the seat ends up on the floor after a beat to windward.
 
I had the idea to stow the acrylic drop board there, where it would serve to divide the area. I did this with the pictured buttons, made with two different holes saws from a piece of a  plastic cutting board, bought at the dollar store. The photo shows it clearly:
You can see the stowed "bum strap" here as well.
 
The Volvo tachometer has a built in hour meter. Unfortunately one day it stopped working although the tach is still fine. Volvo sells only the whole tachometer for about $300. So I fitted a separate hour meter, in a much more visible location. It took only a few minutes. I dentified two wires on an unused plug on the Volvo instrument wiring harness which went to +-12V when the ignition is on and connected the hour meter there.
 
The 371 has rather limited galley counter space. I made a cover for one sink from King Starboard material.


Edited by gshannon - 16 February 2009 at 00:21
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

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scarab View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scarab Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2008 at 15:31
Grahame,
 
I have the same problem with my hour meter. ( it doesn't work Unhappy )
Can you gime me some more specific details how you connected the new hour meter ? ( which kind, etc..)
 
thanks,
 
Koen
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 May 2008 at 19:46
The hour meter is a Faria, most marine stores sell it or a similar one. They all look the same, despite different brands. It cost about $30.
 
On the back of the Volvo instrument panel there was a cable harness with a plug on the end, about 6 or 8 pins.  Using a multimeter I identified one pin as a ground, and another as active 12 volts, only when the ignition is on. I don't remember the color of the wires, but it wasn't very tricky detective work.
 
I cut the two wires close to the connector and spliced pigtail leads to allow them to reach the hour meter, which is just above and aft of the panel, inside the starboard cockpit locker. By the way, I used a hole saw, 52mm or 2-1/8"  to make the mounting hole for the meter. It took less than an hour all told and it worked first try.
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2008 at 00:59
Spinnaker by itself-no main.
 
On Tangleberry we have a regular symmetric racing spinnaker. For racing we set it with a pole and it works very well. But cruising with just my wife as crew we find getting it set up a lot of work, and jibing it even more work.
 
A while back I bought a device called the ATN tacker which (they say) lets you fly a normal spinnaker like an assymetric. Basically it is a slide which fits over the furled jib to which you attach one corner of the spinnaker. You attach one sheet to the other corner. We tried it and it works but it is the same as having the pole right against the forestay, suitable for beam (apparent wind) reaching only. Any further off the wind and the main blankets the spinnaker.
 
On our trip to Alaska I expect to have many long downwind runs up narrow channels. The wind always seems to follow the channels, turning the corners with you, so if you can run dead downwind you can have an easy and relaxing sail.
 
This weekend I decided to try the spinnaker sans pole and also without the main. This worked much better than expected. We were able to sail dead downwind and even somewhat by the lee!  The spinnaker set very well and we could see it much better without the main. Directional stability was excellent and the autopilot steered perfectly without having to work hard. We got 4.5 knots with just 2.5 knots apparent wind (about 7 knots true). When the wind picked up a bit we were doing 6 knots with 7 knots apparent or about 13 knots true.  This was so effortless, I'm sure we could handle much more wind.
 
The pictures tell the story. The one worry was getting it down. The wind increased about the time were ready to douse it (of course). I tried snuffing it while full, but it didn't want to come down. Then I "blew the tack" by tripping the snapshackle on the Tacker, and I was able to lower the sleeve without drama. It looks like this will become our standard downwind rig, at least in lighter winds.
 


Edited by gshannon - 27 May 2008 at 01:00
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

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panos View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote panos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2008 at 15:21
Hi Grahame,
 
It is worth trying to fly the symmetric with two sheets instead of a sheet , a pole and a guy (without main). There is no "by the lee" anymore. You drive as you please as long as you are almost downwind. And the harder it blows the stabler it flies. Finding the exact spot where you attach the sheetblocks needs some testing. Steering the boat requires some talent and concentration though to keep the kite up, but since you race this shouldn't be any problem. Initially this was our training to perfect the gibes.
Another idea to help while sailing downwind is to reef the main. Sailing by the lee becomes much easier and safer since the main is depowered and because the mains head is not twisted so much and there is considerable less rolling. Sometimes,especially with big waves, is even faster since more spinnaker is exposed to the wind , the rolling is reduced and the crew can concentrate to trim the spi for speed, instead to try to avoid the broach.


Edited by panos - 29 May 2008 at 21:42
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote panos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2008 at 21:55

Hi Graham,

Now I read your post again I realized that this you did. I didn't understand "sans" and also got confused with "by the lee". How you define "by the lee" if there is no pole and no main?

A trick I do to lower the spi (even singlehanded) is to rig a thin line(lazy line) starting from the tack to a point in the bow near the forcabin hatch (I use the pole downhaul rings on the deck and a small block).This line is loose while normal sailing. When you want to douse the spi you release some (a lot of) sheet, bring the pole to the forestay and take in this lazy line. The spi collapses immediately and flaps secure in front. I go there and hug it in my arms. While lowering the halyard I push it through the forward hatch always hugging it to keep it collapsed. I leave it there ready for the next hoist. I don't even need a sock (snuffer). Be careful if you try it : If it tries to fly DON'T fight it, let it fly!It will collapse again in a few seconds. Unrolling some genoa before dousing will prevent the spi rolling around the forestayLamp.


Edited by panos - 29 May 2008 at 22:12
Panos

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