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maneuvering in harbours

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peterr View Drop Down
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Joined: 10 February 2018
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    Posted: 23 April 2018 at 17:18
Hello

I would like some good advice on manouvring the Hanse 350 in harbours.
I find it very difficult as soon as there is som wind. We are only two on board, and so far it has been a disasterCry

Best regards Peterr
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Wayne's World View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wayne's World Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 18:02
Peterr,

You would probably find reversing into berths/the wind useful. You just need to be committed and keep the way on. As soon as you stop you are at the mercy of the wind. Practice makes perfect or at least less damaging.

Wayne W
Cruising, currently in the Mediterranean.
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350Bob View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 350Bob Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 18:11
Hi Peter,

It would perhaps be easier to answer if you could give a little more information about exactly what is going wrong? What type of manoeuvre are you attempting?.

In general though if you are have trouble with cross winds I would suggest two things which may help, firstly reduce your windage as much as possible for example drop the spray hood and make sure that your sails are tightly furled, and maybe removing dodgers if you have them.

Secondly in order to maintain control, the boat has to be moving through the water, so I would say maybe you could use a little more speed if possible? Sometimes in strong winds you just have to use more power to counteract the other forces.

Best wishes

Bob
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gshannon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gshannon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 18:14
The bow tends to blow off downwind. I make use of this by reversing into the wind. If the wind is blowing us onto the dock we reverse in. If the wind is blowing us away from the dock we go in bow first, coming in an upwind direction before making the turn. We go in with about a knot of speed, and kill the speed at the last moment with a strong burst of reverse.

Don't be hesitant to ask someone on the dock to help! 

A bow thruster would help sometimes but, but we don't have one.
Grahame

Tangleberry 371-092

aviadesign.com
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SausalitoDave View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SausalitoDave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 18:16
I too have struggled with close-in maneuvering with brisk winds.  "Practice does make Perfect".  That said, a few pointers that have helped me.  (1) Keep the wind off the stern, ie, back into the wind, (2) Have lots of fenders out, (3) Have your second-in-command keep a good sized "roving" fender" on a line that will make it possible to fend off of other boats and structures.  As previously said, you need to keep up enough speed to have rudder authority.  Finally, in open water, practice the back and fill maneuver.

Best

Dave
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Martin&Rene View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin&Rene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 20:13
What are your common berthing situations?  
Coming alongside a long pontoon
Coming in to a short finger pontoon
coming into some form of box berth.
Martin&Rene Hanse 341 Dipper Wheel steering, 3 cabin layout & shallow keel, normally based in Scotland
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peterr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote peterr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 20:31
The most common situation is the box.

Best regards peterr
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Martin&Rene View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin&Rene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2018 at 20:50
Sorry, I cannot help much as thankfully, we do not use that system in Scotland.

As some of the others have said, you have to appreciate that as the saildrive prop is some distance from the rudder, so the ideas that you see in many books and articles about using short bursts of forward or backward to turn the boat do not work.  You have to be moving at some speed for the rudder to work well, so you cannot just move slowly into a berth if there is some wind blowing, you have to come in at a steady speed and then put the engine into reverse to stop the boat.  

We have develop a special technique that my wife (as helm) and I use to get into short finger pontoons, particularly when the wind is blowing you into the berth and I did do a write up that I sent to a magazine, so if you want a copy, pm your email address.   
Martin&Rene Hanse 341 Dipper Wheel steering, 3 cabin layout & shallow keel, normally based in Scotland
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Mad Mo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mad Mo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 April 2018 at 09:48
Dear Peter,
 
I find it most important to do any maneuver very very slowly and in a way that you can stop the boat at any time fully controlled. This means - like already said above - that you should always head with the stern into the wind. By that means you can always keep the boat in position for as long as you want, for example to clear the lines or get one around a pile. Insofar I disgree with the above comment recommending to go into a box with speed. If this goes wrong you damage you boat and others. 
 
Also, do not hesitate to make - controlled - contact with a pile. You can slowly move into a box while keeping contact with the leeward pile. You can even turn the boat into the box by motoring into the leeward stern line turned around the leeward pile.
 
Finally, keep your fenders in while moving into a box. I find it astonishing how many sailors move into a box with their fenders outside only to - most predictable - get stopped by a pile and then losing any control of the boat.
 
BR Moritz
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S&J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote S&J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 April 2018 at 11:42
As a visitor to the Baltic I was at first intimidated by box berths but now I really like how the boat is secure without being blown onto a jetty or pontoon.
My tips are:
* Pick a box that is just wide enough for you to fit into.  If it is too big you may have problems getting lines over posts on both sides.  As previously mentioned, leave your fenders on the deck at this stage.
* Assuming I am going in forwards, I run my lines through the centre hole between the horns of my stern cleats and then use a stopper knot to avoid losing them.
* I let my crew handle the line on the port side while I take the starboard, as this is where my engine controls are.  Once the crew have the bowline over the post, they move forward throwing the fenders over on the downwind side as they go, and then call the distance on the bow
* I can then pull in the upwind line and take it onto the winch to control my forward progress.
* It REALLY helps to have someone ashore to take the bow line, but if no one appears, you can keep the engine in gear at minimum speed and inch forward until the crew is confident they can jump ashore or lasoo a cleat.
H385 #351 Ningaloo UK south coast (2018)
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