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New SD50 Sail Drive Leg

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lukemi View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lukemi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: New SD50 Sail Drive Leg
    Posted: 05 April 2018 at 13:11

Looks like I will need to have the lower leg of my saildrive replaced. It lasted 11 years but I guess time works against some of those parts. Some questions for anyone who has replaced the lower leg of the SD 50 sail drive.

1. Can the lower leg be removed from the bottom of the boat? I can see all the bolts but I'm not sure if they are removed if the flange of the leg will clear the opening. I would imagine I could grind the opening a little bit bigger but not sure if I want to do this. The cost is an additional ~$2000 if my contractor needs to removed the saildrive from above.
 
2. If the saildrive needs to be removed from above does the engine need to be moved forward to gain access? Again the cost increases if the engine needs to be moved forward. My contractor does not know if there is enough room in the 370 to get the sail drive out without moving the engine.
 
Any experiences from those that have done this would be appreciated.
 
Mike
 
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Sea-U View Drop Down
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Joined: 14 September 2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sea-U Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2018 at 13:31
This should not have happened. There must be some earthing problems. They last "forever".

If I would do it myself, I would move the motor a little forward. I have done this on a Volvo 2002. That was quite a simple job. It went faster than expected.

On my 370 there is more room. I think that compensates for a heavier motor.
Sea-U is a 370e #532 located SW Norway
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Rubato View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rubato Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2018 at 18:03
I haven't done it but since I've done enough work in the engine/saildrive area I know that there is no way you can remove the saildrive through the "top" without moving the engine. Sorry you have to go through this, good luck!
Steve

Hanse 400e, #168
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echoofwight View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote echoofwight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2018 at 19:22
I have removed the saildrive leg on my 341. It had to come out from the top and the engine needed to be moved forward. However, it was not difficult and can be removed and replaced in a day or so. On Echo the engine needed to be moved out of the engine bay to give room to remove the saildrive. On some boats the engine may only need to be moved a few inches, it depends on how much room there is behind it. I think it would be impossible to remove and replace the saildrive from underneath the boat and the engine would still need to be moved in order the split the leg from the engine.

Hope this helps

Steve, Echo of Wight
Steve. Hanse 341 Echo of Wight, . Deep draft and rudder, white hull, Single aft cabin. Raymarine instruments. Furuno radar. Garmin AIS. Wheel Steering,   Portsmouth.
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StavrosNZ View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StavrosNZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 April 2018 at 22:32
Your sail drive housing should last indefinitely unless their is an issue.

before you get stuck in you need to be 100% sure of what has caused this problem:
- copper base antifoul instead of non copper?
- no protection on the aluminium at all?
- electrical leak?
- model with hull anode and AC and DC buzz bars connected? if so sail drive anode will waste away very quickly and once gone sail drive housing will be the new anode.

be sure you have identified and resolved the source of this problem before you bolt on a new one and put your boat back in the water.
Stephen
2010 H400, Auckland, New Zealand
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peterlo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote peterlo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2018 at 07:42
On our 400e from 2006 we were forced to replace the saildrive leg, too, due to corrosion. The engine was moved forward a bit in order to allow the saildrive to be removed inside the boat - there is no other possibility. 
I was quite worried, understandably, about why it had corroded, but once the leg was out, the reason was obvious: the previous owner (18 months) had NOT primed the saildrive, but had just applied normal, copper antifoul directly on the leg!

Good luck
Peter
Stormsvalen 167
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H8jer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote H8jer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2018 at 19:21
Originally posted by peterlo peterlo wrote:

had NOT primed the saildrive, but had just applied normal, copper antifoul directly on the leg!
That sounds not good but surely not the lone factor for demise.

Using a lot of shore power, having rudderstock and/or saildrive grounded and no Sterling Pro Save isolator will bring bad things in play.

/h8jer


Hanse 370#480 30HP 3-cabin
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Ratbasher View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ratbasher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2018 at 15:10
Unless you address the cause then youíll become an expert in this process over the years. Looking at the pictures youíve significantly increased the cathodic area with a large folding prop. Iíd hazard a guess that this has overcome the ability of the anodes on the prop and SD to cope and indeed itís hard to see much evidence of them remaining. Like fouling, some areas just seem prone to electrolysis.

Despite fitting my boat with an isolator and having a marine electrician tell me he canít find anything to blame onboard Iíve had the same issues and the folding prop is the prime suspect. However, I changed the anodes at 4-month intervals last year to avoid damage to the leg and this winter fitted a hull anode bonded well to that leg. Will report on the success of this later in the year.

Having asked the same question of an engineer that I respect, the only way to remove the leg involves moving everything; its an expensive job. However, at least youíll have a new gaiter satisfying the need to have that done.

As I reminded myself yesterday on putting the boat into the water only to find the mast needs to come down to replace 9 year old but frayed standing rigging, if you canít take a joke you shouldnít have bought a boat. Good luck though.


Rat

Hanse 400, south coast UK
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Rubato View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rubato Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2018 at 17:41
I have the same folding prop with the same 2 anodes (cone on the hub of the prop and on the saildrive just in front of the prop), no issues...  plugged in year around...
Steve

Hanse 400e, #168
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Ratbasher View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ratbasher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2018 at 21:22
Originally posted by Rubato Rubato wrote:

I have the same folding prop with the same 2 anodes (cone on the hub of the prop and on the saildrive just in front of the prop), no issues...† plugged in year around...


I wish I was so fortunate and a shame that Lukemiís boat is so badly affected. As I indicated, it may be that weíre just berthed in areas where electrolytic forces are so much stronger thus eating the anodes at a much greater rate. The fitting of a folding prop certainly increases the cathodic area. Having eliminated all other causes on my own boat Iíd advise Lukemi to investigate further and not regard a SD leg as a consumable item. In the absence of an obvious cause, frequent anode changes are necessary and Iíll be interested to see the results of the additional hull anode on my own boat.

Of interest, thereís a two-part SD anode that doesnít need the prop removed for fitting.
Rat

Hanse 400, south coast UK
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