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Floor boards and bilgewater

Printed From: myHanse.com
Category: Hints and Tips
Forum Name: 320
Forum Description: 320 Hints and Tips
URL: http://www.myhanse.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=5044
Printed Date: 19 November 2018 at 18:43
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Topic: Floor boards and bilgewater
Posted By: Casper
Subject: Floor boards and bilgewater
Date Posted: 26 April 2011 at 10:49
I am getting water in the bilge and underfloor space while sailing and was going to lift floors to check source! It looks like furniture has been installed on top. Anyone lifted floors?

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Friendly ghost



Replies:
Posted By: nickfabbri
Date Posted: 26 April 2011 at 11:51

Is it salt water? That would be my first test. Dip your finger in and have a taste.

More than likely it is fresh water. I don't think that lifting the flooring will help though. I have had my 320 for three years and have found that if water ingress occurs through loose deck fitments/windows or more likely from  a burst pipe in winter, then because of the compartments under the floor it can take months for it to appear in the liftable sections.
Also when I split my stern shower, although the leak was small ( less than a fast drip), the water pump was starting every ten to thirty seconds.  If your pump is not kicking in regularly, then it is more than likely rain water .
Hope this helps.


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Nick71
Hanse 320


Posted By: Casper
Date Posted: 28 April 2011 at 00:51
Thanks,
It is, as you thought, fresh water so far as I can tell, and there was a frozen and fractured water system pump which allowed spillage.
I understand that the Starboard seat chest assembly can be removed (very heavy) giving access to hull and underfloor space.

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Friendly ghost


Posted By: nickfabbri
Date Posted: 28 April 2011 at 08:55
If the water pump that pressurises the system isn't running or starting every couple of minutes, then your water system is still intact and water tight. I would honestly save yourself the trouble and leave it.
Having emptied my entire water tank into the bilges twice now through frozen stern shower heads, I know that you will be forever chasing water spillage.
I would suggest leaving the bilge pump on auto, getting a large car sponge and going sailing. The heeling and motion of the boat will allow any water to eventually find its way into the area below the ccess panel next to the steps ,spare yourself the boat dismantling chore.


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Nick71
Hanse 320


Posted By: samuel
Date Posted: 28 April 2011 at 19:15
It is a nuisance to unscrew the floor boards to get to the water
I have noted where the deapest part of the bige is &drilled a 8mm hole in the floor board on one of the " lines" in the ply
I now insert the hose from my oil sump pump which is 8mm diameter. being a good fit it holds the pipe nice & square. I push it in until it touches the bilge bottom. I can then pump just about every drop of water out.
The trouble with the bilge pump is that it needs at least 20mm of water to make it switch on.As a result when the boat heals the water comes over the floor board soaking any thing it comes in to contact with
 
Daydream Believer


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Daydream Believer- Hanse 311- No GBR9917T- Bradwell Essex


Posted By: Casper
Date Posted: 29 April 2011 at 00:50
That was the original problem. The previous owner had allowed the water pressure pump to freeze and it had burst turning on and emptying half the tank into bilge. The water was pumped out of all three access points but the pans at each side contain a lot of inaccessable water! This of course appeared while sailing and required a further two bailouts. Apart from slippy cabin sole while sailing, I would like it as dry as possible underneath. I like the idea of extra access points as increased humidity inside the boat is very undesirable for all year round sailing in the UK.

Thanks to all for helpful information.

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Friendly ghost


Posted By: Gordon Harrison
Date Posted: 29 April 2011 at 07:35
Dont forget to keep drying out the compartment with the hot water tank in, if you allow this to fill it will drain itself into the rest of the bilge when heeled. A vacumm pump does this job very well.

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Gordon


Posted By: Drumduff
Date Posted: 01 May 2011 at 14:40
We have also had fresh water in our bilge but I have now finally found out where it's coming from and how to stop it. The water has definately been coming from two places. The first was from the fresh water tank which looked ok until we got hit by 30knot winds on Friday. As the boat leaned over water leaked into the bilge. So that was an easy fix.
The second leak was from where I had suspected which was from the hose connections to the tap in the heads sink.
Contrary to beleif you don't need to pull the entire sink to bits to gain access. The top drawer comes out and you can see the three hoses that fit into the tap assembly. There are hot & cold hoses & the hose to the flexible tap outlet. All these connections are push fit connections. Each hose has an O ring that acts as the seal. On our hot hose had slipped down causing water to leak slowly. There is also a locating pin that holds this hose in place but I'm not sure if that was connected properly from build as I couldn't see how the hose could have slipped had it been in the right place. If you need to get at this pin the tap has to come out of the sink. This is done by undoing the tap holding nut that can be found under the sink. When undone the tap pulls out of its location pulling the hoses up through the sink. I found it easier to disconnect the tap flexible hose from it's hose. It's quite awkward to get at the connections but there really is no need to cut bits of sink furniture away. The galley sink also has push fit connections.


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 06 May 2011 at 15:23
Hi Drumduff,

 I am battling with exactly this problem at present. This is, I think, a legacy from the cold winter which froze my electric water pump, split the stern shower head and pushed the heads sink tap hoses partially out of their connections. The latter fault caused a slow leak which I have only just found. The water found it's way to the bilge under the steps which, as I was not immediately aware of the problem, then deposited water to the bilge area below the galley sink as the boat heeled. In the same area (wrapped in a plastic bag) is one end of the galley 240v. power socket. As a socket has not been fitted in my boat, the electrics are dumped in the bilge area. Needless to say water got into the plastic bag and blew the main power supply at the panel. This took some time to find out the problem and, of course, at the same time, I found the water under the galley. The boat heeling had also allowed water to go into the storage area below the starboard cabin seating. I also found that the heads tap flexible hose connector where it attaches to the water hose from the tap was also leaking. I tightened this and pushed the other three tap connectors back into the tap. To do this I unscrewed the tap holding nut (and now can't get it back as it is so tight). I then spent forever sponging the water from the bilges. The bilge under the stairs still keeps having water come into it and I dont know where it is coming from. I'n not a happy bunny at present!

 I bought the boat to go sailing - not to be pissing about doing this sort of malarky!

John


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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: Drumduff
Date Posted: 07 May 2011 at 09:10

Same for us. All our leaking water problems occurred when the cockpit shower fitting also froze up and split so it's probably been the same for the sink. Still no leaking windows yet though!!Clap 



Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 09 May 2011 at 17:52


Things are not quite as they seem!

Following on from my last posting regards water in the bilge. I thought that I had sponged all of the water from the bilge next to the steps and so could not understand that, an hour or so later, more water had entered the same area. I got fed up with this and decided to lift the floor over the bilge area. This was very simple and only required five screws to be undone. The results are shown in the two photos. The first photo shows the area revealed under the floor. The electric bilge pump and automatic float can clearly be seen as can the manual pump to the right of the float. The compartment to the right of the picture in front of the heads area reveals an indentation in the floor which, when I opened up the floor, was full of water. You can also see a hole between this compartment and the underside of the floor of the heads.

 And this is where things do not appear to be quite straightforward!

 Quite simply, if there is a water leak from, say, the heads tap, it runs down the inside of the hull and deposits in the bottom of the boat. As the water level builds up it spills over into the compartment next to the 'bilge' where the pumps are located. When this fills, the water then transfers into the bilge area where it can be pumped or sponged out. The second picture shows the same compartment with holes to and from it. Thus there has to be quite a lot of water in the bottom of the boat long before it appears in the bilge area. This also allows water to slosh around and appear under the galley area and, as the boat heels, the water is also transferred to the storage area under the starboard seating. Clever - ain't it.

I can feel water under the floor by putting my finger through any of the holes. I feel like the little Dutch boy trying to stop the water from flooding out of the Dyke. (Apologies to you Dutch owners and also to any Dykes who may be reading this)!

 I am now in the process of getting a hand pump with a flexible hose which will reach inside the various holes to see how much water I can pump out from underneath the floor.

 I reckon that water has been building up for over a year (since 'Discovery' was new), from the head tap which has been slowly leaking all this time and which has increased since the freeze up during our recent very cold winter.

I also reckon that many of you other owners have a similar problem but may not yet be aware of how much water is in the hull under the floor area yet has not yet appeared in the pumped bilge area.

 I'll let you know how much I pumped out, over the next few days.

John



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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: Janni
Date Posted: 09 May 2011 at 20:27
In our H320, the bottom section looks a bit different, we have got the seacock for the heads supply in that area.
Janni



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Hanse 320 #548 "SCHNEGGE"


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 10 May 2011 at 22:59
Interesting! I presume that you have to lift the floor board each time you wish to operate the sea cock? On this basis I suspect that you leave the valve open all the time?

 Our sea cock for the heads inlet water supply is situated in the heads cupboard below the vanity basin. This means that it is easy to open and close at will.

John


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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: CharlesP
Date Posted: 11 May 2011 at 00:18
Thanks for all that useful info John. I thought the bilge pump should be in the lowest part of the bilge. Where would this be and can you access it.

Our seacock for the heads water supply is inside the galley sink unit cupboard. So that's three different seacock positions during the final year of 320 production. I wonder why?

I assume an access hatch will be provided for you Janni.

Charles

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'MERIDIAN LADY'

320 Nr 536 2010

Medway


Posted By: Janni
Date Posted: 11 May 2011 at 06:12
Originally posted by JohnA JohnA wrote:

Interesting! I presume that you have to lift the floor board each time you wish to operate the sea cock? On this basis I suspect that you leave the valve open all the time? Our sea cock for the heads inlet water supply is situated in the heads cupboard below the vanity basin. This means that it is easy to open and close at will.John


No. The setup seems to come from the H325 design. The yard has cut an opening into the floorplate, similar to the ones for the inspection of the bilge.
Like that we can operate the sea cock in a good way; we even do not have to go into a cupboard, where you usually have something obstructing the access.
In the heads we still have two other seavalves in the cupboard, for the drain of the shower and the drain of the basin.
Janni

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Hanse 320 #548 "SCHNEGGE"


Posted By: CharlesP
Date Posted: 11 May 2011 at 09:12
I think you have a good improved setup Janni. Our shower drain combines with the basin drain so there is a non-return valve installed, which makes the basin water very, very slow to drain.

Charles

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'MERIDIAN LADY'

320 Nr 536 2010

Medway


Posted By: samuel
Date Posted: 11 May 2011 at 14:00
John A
I note the pic you have sent & it differs from mine in that my wire connections to the pump are right next to the pump. If water goes above the pump the whole lot can short out, leaving me with no electric pump - or any other  electrics for that matter
 
Daydream Believer


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Daydream Believer- Hanse 311- No GBR9917T- Bradwell Essex


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 11 May 2011 at 23:49
Originally posted by CharlesP CharlesP wrote:

Thanks for all that useful info John. I thought the bilge pump should be in the lowest part of the bilge. Where would this be and can you access it.
Charles


Hi Charles,

The lowest part of the bilge is most likely below the floor of the compartment where the electric pump is situated. However there is no access to it as far as I can see.

 Please see my next posting relating to my pumping out efforts today.

John



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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 12 May 2011 at 00:08
Originally posted by JohnA JohnA wrote:



Things are not quite as they seem!  ......................

 I'll let you know how much I pumped out, over the next few days.



On the same subject I made a further visit to 'Discovery' today armed with a couple of hand pumps of different sizes.

 The larger of the two pumps was used to pump out the general area below the heads floor. This also included the area below the existing sump where the electric bilge pump is installed.

 I pumped out in excess of 50 litres of water from this area alone! I then used the smaller pump to gain access to the area below the floor gained by poking the pump inlet pipe through the foreward facing hole in the sump area to the right of the main sump. From this area I pumbed out a further 10 litres or so.

 I am sure that there is still water below the floor boards which is collected within the areas made by the main framework of the base of the hull. I expect this to migrate to the area below the main sump through the movement and heeling of 'Discovery' at sea. We shall see (no pun intended)!

 I feel happier that I have managed to remove the water from below the floors and hope that I have solved the water leak from the head tap inlet pipes. I think that some (or alot) of the water came from the time during last winter when the main water pump froze and cracked and also possibly from the cracked shower head at the transome.

 It would be nice to be able to see a plan of the construction of the hull sole to be able to see how drainage from the compartments is carried out. I am left with the thought that the disposal of bilge water is very poorly dealt with!

John


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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: CharlesP
Date Posted: 12 May 2011 at 12:22
Well done John. What you have discovered will be useful to many of us. Hard to believe that so much water can be hidden away without our knowledge. Surely one would have expected to be able to see it on lifting hatches!

One other matter occurs to me. Suppose there was a gas leak. How would it be cleared? I expect it would migrate to the hidden space like your water, so normal methods would not clear it. Also, how effective is a gas detector unless it can be sited where the gas goes.

Charles

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'MERIDIAN LADY'

320 Nr 536 2010

Medway


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 13 May 2011 at 16:10
Thanks Charles.

I hope that the bilge information is useful for other members. On the subject of gas detectors - perhaps Yeoman/ the moderator could suggest where the most suitable position for a gas detector should be for a 320?

John.

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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: AdrianB
Date Posted: 14 May 2011 at 12:42



Here are some picture our ever helpful dealer took for me when the floor boards were up on our Hanse 320.








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Liquid Leisure - Hanse 320#266 http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au - http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 23 May 2011 at 12:11
Thanks Adrian,

 What fantastic pictures. These prove the point of what I was saying, in that there has to be a lot of water in the bilges before the water fills the electrically pumped area.

 I bet a lot of people didn't know that!

John


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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: Janni
Date Posted: 24 May 2011 at 05:55
Why aren´t there holes between the outer side and the bilge?
Janni

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Hanse 320 #548 "SCHNEGGE"


Posted By: MisterM
Date Posted: 19 June 2011 at 20:42
Since owning my first boats (and house as well, come to think of it), I have been plagued by leakages both above and below the waterline with any model. My first newly acquired boat, the H320, was no exception unfortunately, but until now (and hopefully forever) only from above the waterline (leaking windows, leakage through the "swan's neck for the cables in the mast" and leakage from the stern shower and water tap in the bathroom.
 
My observations and lessons learned at all boats until now, partially duplicating what was already said, are as follows:
1) A maniacal tendency to trace any leakage and repair it; I will tolerate no water in my boat, as any leakage has the potential to ruin interior or components, or sink the boat
2 Point 1 goes double as I want to be able to distinguish between leakages above and below the waterline, since the latter are intolerable
3 The H320 have a bilge system which is A) not appropriately interconnected between the stringers and B) does not have a bassin in which the water is collected at the deepest point, resulting in water potentially being "caught" in one part of the structure. Once the boat starts heeling, the water can penetrate, amongst others, the storage area below the benches, and also the battery storage place as well as the engine electronics. Damage to interior, belongings or elements safeguarding the vessel can be the result. Thus further stressing the importance of point 1.
4) The taps in the boat, at least in the Smartline-version, including the stern shower, are of cheap quality, especially given the connectors to the pipes which are of a "click"-nature. I strongly recommend to replace the 2 taps with good quality ones having a "screw"-connection to the pipes. In addition, I recommend to replace the stern shower with a stainless-steel head and provide proper attention to shutting it off after every use (this involves turning the knob around until the flow of water stops).
5) In addition, but I have no experience with this yet, it might be wise to check (or replace, if necessary) the connections of the hoses to the water tank and inbetween, but these appear quite sturdy to me.
6) Keep 2 or 3 type of hand pumps aboard (including oil pumps) to be able to drain any part of the bilge where there is water. I like the suggestion of creating small holes in the cabin floor to access them easily!
7) There is much dust (from the building process) in all inaccessible areas which, in the case of a serious leakage, would result in being led to the bilge pump, and quickly making it unasable as it would become blocked by it. So vacuum cleaning all areas of the boat to get them free from dust and potential small debris is, in my view, also essential.
8) When not left in a warmed winter storage, always use drinkingwater antifreeze (e.g. the pink stuff from Starbrite) generously in the system, which also prevents the boiler from corroding (which will or can occur when being left empty for a longer period). Wodka is a good alternative, but could leave some taste.
9) If sailing in heavy weather or at sea, make sure to have some accustomed shelters aboard to place over any potentially damaged windows. In addition, all openings (being the gas lever for the engine, the openings for the stern shower, the lockers in the cockpit, the anchor storage, the swan's neck at the mast, all hatches and windows, the entrance to the cockpit, etc., etc. will leak at some point in time, so it's worthwile to make covers for them or make them waterproof through applying putty or any other thing.
 
Looking forward to other contributions and tips for the tenacious and maniacal sailors amongst us!
 
Best regards, Machiel.
 


Posted By: gode.wind
Date Posted: 31 July 2011 at 12:18
Hi Adrian,

I am sailing  in Germany and I have also a problem with water in the bilge.
Last year, the windows have been replaced by Hanse, because these were
glued false and a lot of water entered here.
I have the following question:
Holes in the stringers can be seen. Are these made from you or
been made ​​by Hanse? I think a lot of water is also standing in the
stringers and i have in the moment no way to get this water because
my ship has not such holes in the stringers.
Thank you for replay and understanding my bad english.

Greetings from Germany (Hamburg)
Lothar
l


Posted By: Casper
Date Posted: 31 July 2011 at 21:41
I am very pleased at the helpful responses to my original question and I am now a lot wiser, and Like JohnA. now over 90 litres of water lighter.

Not only was the water pump split by freezing but when it was finally replaced it disclosed leaks at the heads taps and, more seriously at the hot water tank. Thanks too for the excellent photographs from yourself and Adrian, but realise that this is an inner pan with the hull still a space away under that!     Please note this point gode.wind.

MisterM summed up my attitude that boats should not be designed to keep water in, but to keep it out, and allow for its removal quickly and easily in the case of any accident.

Like Charles you obviously agree with me that a bilge pump might be expected to pump out the bilge and not a pan in in inner lining just below the cabin sole!   What that is supposed to do defeats me unless it is only expected to be used when the boat is half submerged by a breaking wave!

In fact the more I look at the interior design the more I think that the sailor designed the exterior and someone who had never been to sea designed the interior. (e.g. no fiddles on the table or shelves and totally inaccessible real bilge low point. I won't get on to accessing wiring!)

I am now considering how best to reach the lowest point inside the hull, below the false bilge in which the original bilge pump is fitted. An extra pump will then try to keep the real bilge clear. It looks like the aft of three trunkings that run athwart-ships is the last place that water gathers and spills from there to other areas as the boat moves. That is just ahead of the galley sink cupboard floor access, and is reached by removing the under starboard bench storage bin when the real hull can be seen. It is forward of your suggestion John. A strum box on the end of a pipe could be fed in to near the centre line. Perhaps this will finally lead to a dry boat and if necessary remove spilt gas.

Hope to go sailing one day instead of hanging upside down with pumps and sponges. It is all a real waste of time for which I hold Hanse responsible.

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Friendly ghost


Posted By: AdrianB
Date Posted: 05 August 2011 at 08:20
Originally posted by gode.wind gode.wind wrote:

Hi Adrian,

Holes in the stringers can be seen. Are these made from you or
been made ​​by Hanse?
l


The boat when it was pictured was a standard 320 #266

I should add that after tracing bilge leaks to a) a leaking head sink tap, and b)  the transom shower...  we may have found our final culprit. At the last engine service  I was advised that one of the cooling hoses was leaking and a replacement was fitted. Sadly because our boat is in commercial survey the bill was not covered by the dealer as a warantee claim.
I can't tell you exactly which hose had to be replaced... but I was told it was a common failure on a Yanmar engine.
Looking forward to a season with a dry bilge now!


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Liquid Leisure - Hanse 320#266 http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au - http://www.liquid-leisure.com.au


Posted By: poole pirate
Date Posted: 08 November 2011 at 15:05
We had a lot of problems with bilge water until we discovered the cockpit shower fitting split every winter. After replacing three times we now hopefully have a slightly better one.


Posted By: Windsurfer
Date Posted: 08 November 2011 at 21:50
Poole pirate...I think you would be better off winterizing the water system before the winter to make sure nothing splits ...otherwise you might end up with split pipes and then spend endless hours replacing them...

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Hanse 320 #079
White hull, tiller, short keel and rudder, standard North sails, Sparcraft rig


Posted By: Louba
Date Posted: 13 January 2012 at 12:18
Originally posted by poole pirate poole pirate wrote:

We had a lot of problems with bilge water until we discovered the cockpit shower fitting split every winter. After replacing three times we now hopefully have a slightly better one.
+ 1Cry
My ship has also leaks at the deck shower and the shower in the bathroom.


Posted By: Old Finn
Date Posted: 13 January 2012 at 15:14
Hi Louba,
after changing the plastimo-plastic showerhead with a metall one, I didn´t have anymore problems with leaking showers.

axel


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S/Y Indian Summer H 320#411 - Sail today, work later


Posted By: Windsurfer
Date Posted: 13 January 2012 at 21:19
What brand and model was the metal shower Old Fin??

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Hanse 320 #079
White hull, tiller, short keel and rudder, standard North sails, Sparcraft rig


Posted By: Old Finn
Date Posted: 14 January 2012 at 11:37
Hi Alex,
I´ve found the showerhead - Have a look at this picture - price: about 13.00€ plus freight





under this link http://www.ebay.de/itm/Bidet-Dusche-Camping-Dusche-Boots-Dusche-Wasser-Stopp-/220925277464#vi-content" rel="nofollow - http://www.ebay.de/itm/Bidet-Dusche-Camping-Dusche-Boots-Dusche-Wasser-Stopp-/220925277464#vi-content .

have a nice day - only 45 days till season starts again.

axel





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S/Y Indian Summer H 320#411 - Sail today, work later


Posted By: Louba
Date Posted: 16 January 2012 at 18:37
http://www.accastillage-diffusion.com/douches,10147/douchette,323280.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.accastillage-diffusion.com/douches,10147/douchette,323280.html
12 € .
 
It's not expensive. :bien:


Posted By: poole pirate
Date Posted: 25 April 2012 at 10:25
Having just sailed from Poole to Falmouth in four hops in force 6, we also had water sloshing around the bilge, and now the electrics from the shore power trip out as soon as we try to turn them on. I shall have a look under the sink etc. as mentioned by a previous sufferer.
 
We have also been getting a considerable amount of water in the fore cabin, when taking water over the bow and in particularly heavy rain. It can only be coming in the fore hatch. We re-bedded the hatch in the main cabin, and I suspect the fore hatch has also been poorly sealed. We seem to be getting a lot of white powder washing out from somewhere. My suspician is that it is because the screws fixing the hatch have not been sealed, and water is finding it's way into the lining before leaking out again. Has anyone else had a problem.
 
I must say, you would think anyone building a boat would make it water tight as a first priority!
 
Poole Pirate.


Posted By: samuel
Date Posted: 25 April 2012 at 10:41

Re white powder

was the last owner making lots of regular night trips ?
I get a small amount of white glassfibre dust on the saloon bunks after a rough sail even after 8 years
It is caused by the large amount of debris trapped over the headlinning at manufacturing stage & is not a problem ( apart from having to dust it up)
 
Re the leak
Not all forecabin leaks are through the hatch. If We take a big sea over the bow & fill up the anchor well it somehow leaks into the lockers under the bunks & the leading edge of the cusions get wet. It seems to come in roughly near where the pulpit rear legs are situated.  it is not actually the bolt holes that leak but the bulkhead at the back of the locker is not properly sealed in the corners
The water can sometimes feed along the tops of the shelves & then dribble down roughly opposite the hatches. In the scheme of things it is no great hassle to us as it has only happened 3 or 4 times in 8 years. But it does beg the question WHY???
Fortunately we do not get this very often as the hanse 312 is an extremely dry boat unless it is an awkward chop


-------------
Daydream Believer- Hanse 311- No GBR9917T- Bradwell Essex


Posted By: JohnA
Date Posted: 25 April 2012 at 10:49
Good morning Poole pirate,

 It was me who had the same problem with water in the bilge, shorting out the shore power electrics. For this to happen bilge water is being pushed into the area below the galley sink as the boat is heeling in a heavy sea. You should also check the storage area beneath the saloon starboard seating area, as the bilge water can also splosh into that area.

The electrics in question is the connection from the main panel to the area below the sink so that a power supply can be fitted as an extra. As the supply is not used, the cables are taped up and left in the area below the access panel under the sink. The bilge water reaches them and shorts out, hence the tripping of the shore power. Solution is to dry out the leads and/or disconnect them from the power supply.

 The existing bilge water can be pumped out from under the floor boards near the heads door. You can see the area from earlier photos. The bilge pump fitted to the Hanse 320 is of little use unless there is huge amounts of water entering the bilge. Why the pump was not fitted lower down is beyond me!

Regards,

John


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Hanse 320 #464 'Discovery'


Posted By: poole pirate
Date Posted: 25 April 2012 at 11:18
Thanks for the suggestions John. There is bilge water in lots of totally inaccessable places it seems. We have a small hand pump to pump out what we can reach. We have just replaced the float switch and re wired the bilged pump, but as you say, it is in a stupid place. Why are there no linking holes through the bulkheads?
 
We do have the switch by the sink wired in, but will try to isolate it to test the shore power. I might wait until my electrician comes to sort our instruments out. We are stuck in Falmouth for a few days.
 
Poole Pirate.


Posted By: CharlesP
Date Posted: 25 April 2012 at 13:23
Poole Pirate - you speak about water getting into the bilges.
Do you have water dripping down from the forward hatch or from around the mast support ceiling area and on to the floor. We had this. In the former case the screws and frame externally were re-sealed and the problem cured. In the latter, we sealed the external "U" tube which takes cables from the bottom of the mast and into the boat with Duct tape and forming a witches hat to cure the problem (waves over the foredeck splash up this "U" tube).

Charles

-------------
'MERIDIAN LADY'

320 Nr 536 2010

Medway


Posted By: poole pirate
Date Posted: 22 August 2012 at 12:10
We have just returned from sailing around Britain and had a lot of trouble with water coming in and flowing over the floor boards. We have previously had trouble from split bathing shower pumps, but not this time. Some times there was water in the main cabin, but mainly in the fore cabin.
 
The main problems arose whenever we had a beat to windward in a stiff breeze, with water coming over the bow. The water came into the fore cabin and the mattress was often wet, with water filling the small wooden shelves on occation. We had to lift the floor boards several times to dry out.
 
The water seemed to be coming in somewhere behind the wooden cabin lining. Some times there was white powder also.
 
I have tried looking for possible sources but can only think it must be getting in where either the toe rail or mooring cleat on the port side is fixed (It only leaks on starboard tack).
 
Has anyone else experienced this ? If so, any suggestions for solving the problem?


Posted By: Louba
Date Posted: 22 August 2012 at 12:30

30 C’est de l’eau douce bomou de l’eau sale?

 

:Welcome: It’s fresh water bomor salt water ?



Posted By: panos
Date Posted: 22 August 2012 at 13:10
Hi,

It is most probable the anchor well!
When you inspect it in the marina everything appears to be perfect, but in rough seas the chain is hopping and pushing the bottom of the well open!
Sea water enters under the chain box and enters the front cabin!

To test this possibility you have to remove the chain and have somebody jump inside the box while inspecting the edges. You might be surprised!

-------------
Panos

Hanse 630e - selling her -


Posted By: poole pirate
Date Posted: 23 August 2012 at 09:53
It's salt water. I will check on the anchor well as suggested by our man in Greece. I have spoken to the Hanse office in Hamble and it has been suggested I check any cable runs from the anchor locker also, and also take out the self tapping screws fixing the toe rail and re bed in sikaflex, together with the bolts holding the mooring cleats which evidently screw into an aluminium plate. I will let you know if I get a result.


Posted By: cafemino
Date Posted: 18 April 2018 at 22:21
Hi,

I've just seen your neat idea of drilling an hole in the floor of a Hanse 320 to get to water in the bilge at the lowest point. Do you remember where the hole was drilled?

Many thanks,

Luke 



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