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Where to store a tender

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seaspray View Drop Down
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Joined: 05 September 2017
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    Posted: 05 September 2017 at 20:16
I'm considering buying a 415 - it increasingly looks like my kind of boat...

One question I'm wondering is what arrangement current owners make for their tender. On the East Coast (UK) where I sail we currently use our tender a lot - and keep it securely fatsened and inflated on the sugar scoop transom of our Oceanis 351.  

It's convenient to keep it permanently inflated - but can the same be done on the 415 without installing davits?  Otherwise, I'm convinced it would stow deflated in the 2 cabin variant, but should I end up with the three cabin variant, do the cockpit lockers have room for a deflated dinghy?
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S&J View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote S&J Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 September 2017 at 20:43
I think you will find the 415 a vastly better sailing boat than the Oceanis. I switched from an Oceanis 321 to a 385 three years ago. The Hanse is faster, stiffer and all round a much better boat.

Like you I used the sugar scoop on the Oceanis for a dinghy. Now I store it immediately in front of the spray hood, although I am in the process of installing a solar panel there which may change things.

Here in the Baltic most people seem to tow their dinghies.
H385 #351 Ningaloo now cruising the Baltic
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High Time View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote High Time Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 September 2017 at 21:07
Hi Seaspray

We have the 3 cabin version and have not regretted it. Most of the time the third cabin is used as the store room for all the large items that need to be kept dry. This includes the folding bikes (in bags), folding chairs and table, rucksacks for shopping etc. We also store the dinghy in there in its bag when it's not needed. Occasionally we remove some of the stuff and use the cabin as intended for family members to sleep. You can't do that with the 2 cabin version.

When the dinghy is inflated we store it inverted in front of the mast on passage tied down securely to the stanchion bases and the cleats. In this position it does not restrict forward vision or obstruct the self tracker in any way and is ready for immediate use when we arrive. 

I should mention that the dinghy is a 2.3m round tail. Anything much longer would be more of a problem.
Roger

High Time (415 #038)
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Mr Bluesky View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mr Bluesky Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 September 2017 at 18:11
We do the same as High Time as have a solar panel on coach roof in front of spray hood. Our tender is also 2.3m and fits ok under jib if in regular use. The dinghy has a wrap rather than a bag to stow, and with a deflator adapter on the pump I can deflate & stow easily in port cabin (shed) in just 5 minutes as long as its dry. I guess everything we do on a boat needs a little patience, it's the nature of the beast. 😉
Mr Bluesky
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Martin&Rene View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin&Rene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 September 2017 at 21:37
Even on our 341, we store the dinghy upside down on the fore-deck by the opening hatch, with some pipe insulation on its transom to protect the deck.  You just have to make certain you get the right size, dinghy and I am sure some of the other 415 owners will tell you which dinghy to get.  We just hoist the dinghy up on the spinnaker halyard.    Having had a RIB, with an outboard on, turn upside whilst we were on a mooring and having heard so many tales of people having problems when out at sea, we never tow a dinghy.
Martin&Rene Hanse 341 Dipper Wheel steering, 3 cabin layout & shallow keel, normally based in Scotland
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Simon L View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simon L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2017 at 12:28
We have a new arrangement for our dinghy which I am rather smug about!
 
I had two jackstays made up, 6.5m in length, and we use the topping lift to hang the dinghy sideways along the stern when inflated.   Each jackstay is looped around the inner stanchion of the pushpits, around the dinghy, and then up to tie to the topping lift.  It's amazingly stable, is high enough not to get caught by wave when heeling, but not too high to restrict visibility backwards.
 
When deflated it lives in the third cabin as bed mate for our 10 year old.
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High Time View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote High Time Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2017 at 13:00
Hi Simon

That sounds like a great solution. Any photos just to confirm my understanding of your set-up?

I might give that a try on High Time. The foredeck solution we currently use works OK but does restrict movement at bit up front when berthing or anchoring.
Roger

High Time (415 #038)
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Simon L View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simon L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2017 at 14:04
I don't think that I do have any photos, but hopefully this is a little clearer:
1) The webbing is in two separate parts.  Each has a twisted loop one end, and a straight loop the other, and I think was 6.5 metres long, but 6.0 would have been fine..  The twisted loop "produces a cow hitch type finish where the standing part is passed back through the loop - for securing around large deck fittings" (from JimmyGreen website where I bought them).
2) put the twisted loop end around the inner pushpit stanchion, then pull the rest of the line through the loop.
3) line the dinghy up along the stern, floating with its side along the stern.
4) pass the end of each of the webbing lines through the handles on the near side of the dinghy, then under the dinghy, and up together on the far side.  (This just makes sure that the webbing ends up sitting in roughly the right place as it goes under the side of the boat, as this is where it carries the weight of the boat when pulled up).  On our dinghy the handles are long lines of plastic rope glued front, middle and aft, so big gaps to go through.  We decided it was important that the weight of the dinghy is carried by the webbing going around the inflatable tube, not by pulling on the handles, or they will come off. 
Don't pass them through the handles on the far side (we found it didn't pull through well, and was in danger of pulling the handles off the boat).
5) pull the two ends tight(ish), and bring them up to the topping line.  Tie the topping line through both, and the topping line must pass between the triangle of the backstay (thus you mustn't make the webbing lines too long, or they will reach above the top of the triangle).  This helps to avoid it swinging.
6) pull topping lift until the dinghy is up on its side, but floating.  Person at the stern then lifts it 2 foot or so, and the person on the topping lift takes up the slack & makes good.
7) tie each end of the boat to the pushpit somewhere so that it doesn't swing around or tip up.
 
We probably wouldn't do this arrangement in a blow, but it was so much better than towing.
 
Hope that helps?  The webbing cost us about 60.
 
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High Time View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote High Time Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2017 at 14:52
Hi
I think I follow that but how do you get the webbing through the handles and then underneath the tender before the lift? I assume the bathing platform is up before the process starts but does someone need to be in the dinghy to handle the webbing or can it all be done from on deck, maybe using the boat hook?

What make and size is your dinghy, by the way, as this might make a difference.

Thanks.
Roger

High Time (415 #038)
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Simon L View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simon L Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 September 2017 at 18:20
Ha, very good questions!
 
Now that you mention it, yes - we have the platform down to start with, and someone in the dinghy to pass the webbing under it.  Effectively once you have it through the handles on one side, you just loop it around each end of the dinghy, and let it sink underneath so as you gently pull tight it moves into the right position under the dinghy. 
 
Then pull the tails with you as you get out, raise the platform and bring the dinghy next to the stern by pulling the webbing.
 
We have a DinghyGo which is 2.75m, 1.45m beam and 33kg.  You can get a sense of what I mean by the "handles" on this site: http://www.dinghygo.com/
The handles are the black rope down each side.
 
 
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