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Whisker Pole

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Magicol View Drop Down
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    Posted: 15 August 2017 at 22:16
We are getting to know our new 345 and enjoying it very much. The self tacking system certainly helps when short handed. However, I am keen to improve our down wind performance and I am looking to set up a whisker pole for the jib. Are there any tips for deploying a whisker pole with the Hanse self tacking arrangement? I would be pleased to hear how other Hanse owners have organised their whisker pole.
Hanse 345 based on the Clyde
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Old Racer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Old Racer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 August 2017 at 17:51
I have to admit when it gets to the stage of the jib needing poled out we just roll it away.
 
Not noticed any drop in performance under main only.
 
Clyde sailing also.
Hanse 320 Olicana Inverkip Scotland
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fendant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2017 at 14:04
I have tried to use an extendable boot hook with the jib on my 345. This solution did not get me anywhere.
Finally I added a 75m2 furling gennaker and reinforced the bow sprit with a bob stay. On courses 130 - 180 deg and light winds < 6kn we often only hoist the gennie and leave the main in the bag.
Frank
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Jonas C View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jonas C Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 August 2017 at 18:10
The problem i see with using a pole is that the sheet still is in an awkward position.
Im thinking of adding an additiona attachment in the side rails and using an additional sheet while reaching in order to utilise the full power from the jib.
Hanse 345 #15
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Pieterman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pieterman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 August 2017 at 03:32
The major problem here is the small jib. In downwind sailing it is often covered by the mainsail, sure influenced by course and wind strength. I think a bigger sail is a good solution to your problem: gennaker, spi, code 0... 
Ideal for me when sailing short handed or single handed is to take the best of two worlds:
- the use of the self tacking jib sailing upwind and tacking a lot
- increase the surface downwind using a (easy) rollable code 0
The only disadvantage of this combination is the angle between 150-160 and 180. Then I have to jibe more often which is not a real problem when sailing bigger distances. I could hoist the gennaker on these courses, but being often single handed, I notice now I never choose this option. Always the code 0, which increases my sailing pleasure a lot.


Pieterman
Hanse 315 #523
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Magicol View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Magicol Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 August 2017 at 22:27
Thanks for the replies. Yes, we tend to furl the jib when sailing down wind as I don't like to see the constant backing of the sail and the block frequently crossing and re-crossing the track. We like the self tacker, so at present we don't have plans to rig a genoa. In any event, I have been really pleased with the balance of the rig on our 345 and I wonder if a larger sail ahead of the main would impact on this balance. I would be interested in any experience of this.
However, I do feel that some form of barber hauler, which I think Jonas C suggested, would help to keep the jib pulling more efficiently when sailing off the wind. Has anyone fitted such an attachment? Again, any advice would be welcome. Photographs would be really appreciated.
And as an aside, we find this forum really helpful and supportive. Thanks everyone!
Hanse 345 based on the Clyde
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Martin&Rene View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin&Rene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 August 2017 at 21:35
I do use a whisker pole on my Hanse 341 to boom out the jib on a dead run.

I use a lightweight dinghy spinnaker pole around about 2.5m long (ex Fireball dinghy?) with spinnaker pole hook fittings on both ends and attach it to the normal spinnaker pole fitting on the mast.  I have rigged up a 10mm rope through the spinnaker uphaul pulley in the mast and attach it to the outer end of the spinnaker pole with a small snaplink.  As the load to keep the pole up is very small on this rope I just secure it in a  cam cleat mounted on the mast about 0.5m above the deck. 

I have a barber hauler system set up on the toe rail so that I can control the twist on the jib downwind by connecting the barber hauler to the jib sheet using a snatch (opening) pulley block.   But on a dead run, I fasten a loop from the windward barber hauler outside the guard rails and over the end of the spinnaker pole and when it is pulled tight it acts in effect as a downhaul/fore-guy/aft-guy and so the spinnaker pole is now fairly fixed in one position.

I then fasten an extra lightwight jib sheet to the clew of the jib with a snaplink, lead it  through the outer end of the spinnaker pole and then back to a winch on the cockpit coaming.  In my case, I can run it through a genoa sheet fairlead, but you could also run it through a small block fastened to the windward aft mooring cleat. 

I find this set up works well with in light to medium winds with the apparent wind at 160-180 deg and it is quite stable, balances the boat well and you get used to working out whether you need to luff up or bear away if the jib starts to collapse.   Setting up a boom preventer may sometimes be a good idea, if you are running dead downwind for a long time

Really this way is very similar to how the instructors would teach normal goosewing technique, as you can easily let the extra sheet loose and luff up or even gybe if you need to to avoid a collision without needing to remover the spinnaker (whisker) pole. 

Writing about it has taken longer to do than actually setting it up in practice.  Perhaps I need to take a photo of the set up, the next time we use it.

If it is windy we may just run with just the main, but last week I was pleased to find that with just the jib up and controlled with a barber hauler, we were doing over 5kts in a 20kt wind. 
Martin&Rene Hanse 341 Dipper Wheel steering, 3 cabin layout & shallow keel, normally based in Scotland
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Magicol View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Magicol Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 August 2017 at 23:15
Thanks Martin & Rene. This is a very helpful description. Other than the mast fitting and the pole, I think we can replicate this system and I would like to try this out.
I am also interested in your barber hauler system. Do you run lines back to the cockpit to control this? Ever since we got our boat, I have been trying to work out how best to control the jib and the track when off the wind. I have not yet seen a Hanse with a fixed barber hauler arrangement; if you get a chance to take some photographs, these would be much appreciated.
In any event, thanks for the advice.
 
Hanse 345 based on the Clyde
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Interlude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 August 2017 at 08:36
We have added lightweight jib sheets through blocks well forward on the toe-rail - halfway to a barber hauler I guess.  On the previous mooring (up a river) we generally went home directly down-wind, and used them regularly.  Having now moved to a marina on the harbour, I have more freedom to gybe downwind, which is generally what we do now.  I contemplate a code 0 on a furler .......
Interlude 342#241
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Martin&Rene View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin&Rene Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 October 2017 at 12:26
Magicol

As promised, I have finally got round to taking some photos of my jib setups. As they relate to my 341, I have posted them on the 341/342 forum.

http://www.myhanse.com/controlling-the-jib-downwind_topic10476.html

The principle will be the same on your boat, provided you can work out how to secure the pulleys to the toerail.  Whilst I have a proper spinnaker pole uphaul pulley on my boat, if you do not you could easily use a small pulley mounted externally on the mast with just 5 mm line through it.
Martin&Rene Hanse 341 Dipper Wheel steering, 3 cabin layout & shallow keel, normally based in Scotland
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